Category Archives: network literacy

VLE #MFLNchat recap

The Personal Finance Virtual Learning Event, held June 2-4, featured daily Twitter chats focused on the topics discussed in that day’s webinar. The webinar speakers were on hand to answer questions and to dig deeper in to the topics discussed in the 90-minute sessions. Here, you can view all the tweets shared during these daily chats, including great discussion on promoting positive financial behavior change and resources to share and use with clients.

Twitter Chats: A Professional Development Tool

 

By Barbara O’Neill, Ph.D., CFP®

Rutgers Cooperative Extension

In early June, as part of the 3-Day Virtual Learning Event (VLE), the Military Families Learning Network (MFLN) held a series of three Twitter chats using the hash tag #MFLNchat. The eXtension VLE Learn page with archived webinars is  located here. The purpose of the Twitter chats was to extend conversations in the “chat” section of the webinars about encouraging positive financial behaviors through motivation, coaching, and counseling. A Storify summary of the three Twitter chats can be found here. Storify is a free online application that allows people to create “stories” from the text, links, and photos found within in tweets and Facebook and Google+ messages.

Prior to the three Twitter chats, a “Lite” Twitter Cohort was held to introduce chat participants to the basics of using Twitter. Each day for two weeks, cohort 36 cohort participants received e-mailed messages about using Twitter. Materials for the cohort are available here. Participants used the hashtag #twittercohort to hold asynchronous conversations with one another.

Twitter chats, on the other hand, involve synchronous conversations. As the number of Twitter users has grown since its inception in 2006, so has the use of Twitter for financial education. An increasingly outreach method is Twitter chats, which use the hashtag (#) symbol to hold a “conversation” through an organized stream of tweets from people interested in the same topic (e.g., credit).

The formatting convention used to organize Twitter chat threads is Q1 for Question 1 and A1 for participant responses to that question, with 8 to 10 different questions per one-hour chat. All users have do is log in to a Twitter application such as http://www.tchat.io/ or http://twubs.com/ at a designated time and time zone, type in the hashtag for the chat, and start responding to and/or asking questions to engage with others.

The MFLN plans future professional development Twitter chats and encourages Personal Financial Management Program (PFMP) staff to participate. Feel free to “lurk” for a while, if you’d like, and then jump in. Another good idea is to observe, and then participate in, these regular personal finance Twitter chats: #creditchat (Experian, 3 p.m. ET on Wednesdays), #wbchat (WiseBread, 3 p.m. ET on Thursdays), #cashchat (@MsMadamMoney, 12 noon ET on Fridays), and #mcchat (Money Crashers, 4 p.m. ET on Fridays).

Below are some screen shots that further explain how to navigate a Twitter chat:
  1. Go to as http://www.tchat.io/
  2. In the top, right corner click on “Sign In”
  3. If you are already logged into your Twitter account, this box will prompt you to “Authorize TweetChat…to use your account”. You then click on “Authorize App”

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  1. If not it will ask you to log into your Twitter account. Log in with your Twitter handle and password.

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  1. Then, in the top left hand corner, type in the hashtag you are following and then press, “Go”

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For Example:
  • Experian Tweetchat’s hashtag is “#CreditChat”
  • Wisebread Tweetchat’s hashtag is “#WBchat”
  1. You will then be taken to a stream of Tweets, only with the hashtag you typed in during the last step.

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  1. You can then Tweet or Retweet whatever you wish, and the http://www.tchat.io/ application will add the hashtag on for you so that you too can join the conversation!

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Use these icons when you are tweeting:

 RespondThis allows you to Tweet at, or respond to, someone directly.

RetweetThis allows you to ReTweet someone else’s tweet; i.e., send it to your Twitter followers.

FavoriteThis allows you to Favorite someone’s Tweet; i.e., indicate that you like what they have shared.

Happy tweeting! I hope to see you on a personal finance Twitter chat soon.

Twitter Cohort Lite

By Molly C. Herndon , Social Media Specialist

The Personal Finance and Network Literacy teams will again be joining forces to create a learning opportunity for folks interested in Twitter. The 2-week event will begin May 18.

This year’s event will focus on asynchronous activities that participants can complete at their own pace. The event’s guides have assembled resources and homework for participants that will teach new skills and broaden existing networks. Watch videos and view last year’s syllabus here.

The Twitter Cohort Lite promises to be an easy way to get your feet wet and start tweeting with a supportive and encouraging network of professionals. By participating in this year’s event, you will:

  • Twitter-CohortBuild your Twitter personal learning network centered around your interests.
  • Engage in conversations with a Twitter community that starts with your fellow cohort members and reaches across the world.
  • Start online relationships that will last into the future.
  • Begin to see how Twitter can be used for teaching, learning, and connecting.

So if the Twitterverse seems intimidating or if you’re just learning to enhance your own personal learning network, register today for this immersive learning opportunity.

This post was published on the Military Families Learning Network blog on May 5, 2015.

A Guide to Mobile Payments – Security and Fraud Prevention

By HLundgaard (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
By HLundgaard (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
With the recent news of credit card fraud, the mobile phone industry has made a big push to get behind mobile payment. Mobile payment has been touted as a way to reduce credit card fraud because the cashier doesn’t have access to a physical card that would contain an individual’s name, credit card number or security code.

If you are thinking about beginning to get in to the mobile payment system, but still concerned about security and fraud, here’s what you need to know.

The two major smartphone platforms, Apple (Apple Pay) and Google (Google Wallet) have implemented their solutions in order to address credit card fraud. Apples system launched in 2014 while Google’s launched in 2011. Following are the details of how each addresses security and fraud.

Apple Pay implementation of mobile payment security is to combine near-field communications (NFC) technology for payment processing and the iPhone Touch ID fingerprint reader or passcode for security. Your bank payment network creates a unique device account number specifically tied to the phone and to the credit card added. In the event of theft or a lost phone, you can place your phone in lost mode to suspend Apple Pay transaction. Apple Pay is reactivated once you unlock your phone with your pin code.

Google Wallet implementation of mobile payments also uses NFC technology for payment processing but instead of a fingerprint reader like the Apple Pay’s implementation, you use a PIN that only you know. Google stores your credit card information on its server and transmit the encrypted data using secure socket layer technology. Google Wallet Fraud Protection covers 100 percent of all transactions. In the event of theft or a lost phone, you can go to the Google Wallet website and remotely disable your phone.

Both Apple and Google offer similarities in how they address credit card fraud. They both use NFC which means that the phone and the receiver have to be very close to each other in order to begin the financial process transaction. They also implement security on the phone through the use of either fingerprint reader and/or passcodes. Both companies utilize tokenization which allows the credit card number to be unique and transaction specific. With the mobile payment industry expected to account for up to 50 percent of all U. S. digital commerce by 2017, these companies are aggressively promoting their platform as a way to provide consumer confidence in mobile payments as a measure in increasing security and preventing fraud.

Author: Terrence Wolfork (+Terrence Wolfork,@trwolfork )

This post was published on the Military Families Learning Network blog on April 30, 2015.

Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

Body-based Therapeutic Approach to Healing Trauma

By Christina Herron and Kacy Mixon, PhD

Creative Commons [Flickr, Yoga, November 6, 2014]
Creative Commons [Flickr, Yoga, November 6, 2014]
Trauma is an occurrence that threatens a person’s life and/or sense of safety.  The National Child Traumatic Stress Network identifies trauma as a result of many factors, including: domestic violence, neglect, physical/sexual abuse, traumatic grief, community & school violence, natural disasters, medical trauma, refugee/war zone trauma, terrorism, early childhood trauma and complex trauma [1]. Payne, Levine, & Crane-Godreau (2015), relay…

“Trauma is in the nervous system and body, and not in the event; an event that is very traumatic to one person may not be traumatic to another, as people differ very widely in their ability to handle various kinds of challenging situations due to different genetic makeup, early environmental challenges, and specific trauma and attachment histories [2].”

Peter Levine is the founder of Somatic Experiencing (SE). SE is considered to be a body-based therapy approach. Body-based therapies help client’s access traumatic experiences that are not yet available for verbal narration and cognitive reflection. These are stored in non-verbal parts of the brain such as the amygdala and in sensory organs [2].

SE Body-Based Therapies help individuals alleviate feelings of fear, disconnection, helplessness, and fear that can arise because of trauma. Some of these include Restorative Yoga, Sensory Motor Therapy, Hakomi Method, Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), Internal Family Systems, etc.

“SE therapists have to learn to watch, not just listen; to know when to slow down, when to point out and explore a physical response” [3].

Adrienne Baggs, PhD, one of MFLN Family Development’s presenters for our April 23, 2015 webinar on Wellness Strategies, Burnout Prevention, and Mindfulness Part 2, has done extensive research on the benefits of Restorative Yoga when working with victims of trauma, especially PTSD.

More insight into Baggs’s experience with restorative yoga can be found in the article, “3 Restorative Yoga Poses To Help Heal Trauma.”

Below are additional resources that may provide more insight into Body-Based Therapies:


 Reference

[1] National Child Traumatic Stress Network (n.d.). Types of Traumatic Stress. Retrieved from http://www.nctsn.org/trauma-types

[2] Payne P., Levine P.A., & Crane-Godreau, M.A. (2015). Somatic experiencing: Using interoception and proprioception as core elements of trauma therapy. Frontiers in Psychology,  6(93). doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00093

[3] Giarretto, Ariel (2010). Healing trauma through the body: The way in is the way out. Psychotherapy.net

 

This post was written by Christina Herron & Kacy Mixon, PhD, members of the MFLN Family Development (FD) team which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.

Reliability of online information – “flipped” webinar

Webinar cover artOn Monday April 20, 2015 at 1 P.M. Eastern we’ll be having an online session discussing assessing the reliability of online information. Rather than just delivering a webinar presenting information, this will be modeled on a “flipped classroom“.

Once you complete the registration form for the session, you will be given three websites to review along with some resources to help you frame your evaluation. During the live session, we will discuss the sites, methods useful to assessing reliability, and reasons why it’s important to vet sites. The pre-session activities should take no more than an hour, and we’ll have an hour for live interaction.

As we wrote in “Is that so?” in 2012: “It’s your reputation, time, money, health, or well-being that’s at stake when you make decisions or publish based on information you discover online. How carefully you vet that information and its source is up to you.”

Author: Stephen Judd (@sjudd)

This post was published on the Military Families Learning Network blog on April 14, 2015.

Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

FD Webinar: Wellness Strategies, Burnout Prevention, & Mindfulness

Two Part Series on Wellness Strategies, Burnout Prevention, & Mindfulness Part 2

Date: April 23, 2015

Time: 11am-1pm Eastern

Location: https://learn.extension.org/events/1879#.VKw3JSvF9uJ

cover_Kacy_Mixon__June_3__2006

Adrienne Baggs, PhD and Isabel Thompson, PhD,  will explore not only current research findings linked to wellness and mindfulness but also how  mental health clinicians and those in helping professional roles can utilize this information to implement preventative and restorative practices in their work and personal lives. The presentation will also include practical examples that individuals can provide to families dealing with stress, anxiety and other difficulties that can provide barriers to wellness.

We offer 2.0 National Association of Social Worker CE credits and CE credits for licensed Marriage and Family Therapists in the state of Georgia for each of our webinars, click here to learn more. For more information on future presentations in the 2014 Family Development webinar series, please visit our professional development website or connect with us via social media for announcements: (Facebook & Twitter)

 

Passwords and online safety

passwordimage

In early August, the New York Times reported that Russian hackers had “amassed the largest known collection of stolen Internet credentials, including 1.2 billion username and password combinations and more than 500 million email addresses” This report is but the latest in a string of news stories about the credentials of Internet users being compromised. In the past year, there have been many data breaches including Target, Adobe, Michaels and others.

Typically, when a single site is breached, the advice is to change your credentials for that one site, and any others where you use the same credentials. However, in this instance the stolen passwords and usernames were from many websites, and a detailed list of the affected sites is not available.

This incident and similar ones should be the impetus for you to consider how you secure your identity when using websites for communication, banking, purchasing, social networking, and all the activities we do online. Good security requires sacrificing a bit of convenience, but the peace of mind is worth it.

Password Security
 – your responsibility

Most sites require you to login with a username (often an email address) and a password. Since your email address is most likely public, your password is the “secret” that you are using to prove to the website that you are who you say you are. Creating a good password and keeping it secret are vital to online security.

This article about passwords, from the Network Literacy area of the eXtension site provides information on password usage, choosing a good password, remembering passwords, and two-factor authentication.

Some key takeaways

  • Passwords should be long, complex, and different for each site you use
  • Keeping track of passwords is a key barrier to people adopting a strong password policy for themselves
  • Two-factor authentication adds another component to security, making the compromise of a password less harmful

The World Wide Web was originally developed without much thought given to security – it was a model built on trust. Incidents like this make clear that security is necessary, and that each of us is responsible for protecting our identities and credentials.

Authors: Stephen Judd (@sjudd) and Terrence Wolfork (+Terrence Wolfork, @trwolfork )

This article (Passwords and online safety) was originally published Thursday August 14, 2014 on the Military Families Learning Network blog, a part of eXtension.

Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

The Value of Research for Financial Professionals

By Molly C. Herndon

Social Media Strategist 

For financial professionals working with clients in the field, economic research may seem abstract and non-applicable to their daily practice. Our August 12 webinar, Cliffs Notes from the Journal of Financial Planning & Counseling will highlight some of the more relevant articles from the journal and discuss the practical implications and impacts of the research.

Reading by Pedro Ribeiro Simões is licensed Creative Commons. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode
Reading by Pedro Ribeiro Simões is licensed Creative Commons.

Indeed, measuring outcomes is a significant way we all benefit from academic economic research. The evaluation of the outcomes of projects, programs, and initiatives encourages the improvement of programs to better reach and connect with their audiences. Thus, financial professionals have better access to programs to continue their own education, and a richer well of knowledge to share with clients.

Of course, financial professionals benefit from consuming research as well. By reading journals, financial professionals stay on top of current practices, trends, and can help develop programs that meet the needs of their clients by incorporating empirical evidence.

So make plans to go through some research briefs with Dr. Barbara O’Neill on Tuesday, August 12 at 11 a.m. ET. She will discuss not only the findings of various economic studies, but also the practical application of these findings. More information about this 90-minute webinar is available here. 

This post was published on the Military Families Learning Network blog on August 8, 2014.

Goodbye AleX

The eXtension Network Literacy Community of Practice (CoP) will no longer be tweeting using the @AleXNetLit twitter account.

In a blog post explaining AleX, we wrote:

“AleX NetLit is an experiment. She is a new tool for learning in the changing knowledge and communication landscape. Will she make an impact? We’re not sure, but we will keep trying to use new and innovative tools to help people understand and harness the power of online networks.”

After careful consideration, the CoP steering committee, with input from the broader community, decided that our use of AleX was not making a significant impact, and that our efforts would be better directed elsewhere.

Members of the Network Literacy CoP remain active on social networks and use the hashtag #netlit to signify posts of interest to the community. Please look for that hashtag, or visit our page https://www.rebelmouse.com/NetworkLiteracy/, where we aggregate #netlit posts from across social media sites.

Where we went wrong

While we firmly believe that using a persona to communicate and help focus our message via social media was a worthwhile endeavor, there are things we could have done better:

  • AleX was crafted to help us think about one of our target audiences – Military Families’ Service Professionals. However, we never gained traction with that particular audience, and are now working to help them get started in social media instead.
  • We rotated the responsibility of tweeting as AleX, but most of us simply channelled what we would normally tweet through her account. AleX never developed her own personality and lacked consistency in style and content.

We’re open to the possibility of using a persona when we feel it will help build engagement and communication with others. Any future use of a persona will be informed by the lessons we learned while tweeting as AleX.

 

Stephen Judd – UNH Cooperative Extension and Chair, Network Literacy CoP

Bob Bertsch – North Dakota State University Extension, frequent AleX contributor, and Engagement Coordinator, Network Literacy CoP

Peg Boyles – Network Literacy CoP member and frequent AleX contributor

 

This article (Goodbye AleX) was originally published Monday July 7, 2014 on the Military Families Learning Network blog, a part of eXtension.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.