Posts Tagged ‘militaryfamilies’

Factual Friday: February 28, 2014

Friday, February 28th, 2014

Factual Friday February 28

*Underemployed, as defined by the parameters of the survey, means “they possess more formal education/experience than needed at their current or most recent position.” 

Source: Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) and the Institute for Veterans and Military Families at Syracuse University (IVMF).

This post is part of a series of Factual Friday posts published on the Military Families Learning Network blog.

Earn AFC CEUs 24 hours a day

Thursday, February 27th, 2014

Did you know you can view the recordings of any of our 29 Personal Finance webinars and earn 1.5 Continuing Education Credits by simply taking a short quiz? That’s right. Choose from a variety of topics ranging from the financial implications of divorce to tax issues for military families, take a quiz, score 80% or higher and you’ll receive a certificate of completion.

This allows personal finance professionals to earn CEUs at a time that is most convenient. In addition to the nearly 30 recorded webinars, the MFLN Personal Finance community will continue to produce live 90-minute webinars throughout 2014. We typically host one webinar per month. Our next presentation will be March 4. Tax Planning Updates for Military Families is worth 1.5 CEUs for AFC-credentialed participants.

For more information on how to earn AFC CEUs from the Military Families Learning Network’s Personal Finance webinars, click here.

This post was published on the Military Families Learning Network blog on February 27, 2014. 

What is one thing you think every professional who works with service members & caregivers should know within your area of expertise?

Monday, February 24th, 2014

What is one thing you think every professional who works with service members and military family caregivers should know within your area of expertise? This was the question that the eXtension Military Caregiving concentration area, part of the Military Families Learning Network, asked professionals at Fort Campbell, KY.

eXtension Military Caregiving is creating a new video series on Professionals Helping Professionals, where we sit down with military professionals to get feedback on how to better serve the needs of wounded service members and their family caregivers. In many cases, wounded warriors and caregivers have a difficult time navigating the various systems as they transition from active duty status to veteran status. It’s important for professionals working with this clientele to provide proper education and counseling so as to assist families in creating a “new normal.”

The Professionals Helping Professionals series will present success stories, advice and best practices to help military professionals manage their day-to-day tasks. Click on the video below to learn more about what professionals had to offer at Fort Campbell in our very first video of the series.

 

Factual Friday: February 21, 2014

Friday, February 21st, 2014

FF_02142014

Source: The Mental Health Advisory Team 9 (MHAT 9) Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) 2013 Afghanistan report

This post is part of a series of Factual Friday posts published on the Military Families Learning Network blog.

Recognizing Similarities, Differences, & Challenges within Military Family Caregivers

Friday, February 21st, 2014

Caregiver Commonalities & DifferencesMilitary family caregivers are unique in that many are caring for individuals with complex injuries such as posttraumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, amputations, blindness, burns and other conditions unlike nonmilitary family caregivers. In a two-part article series on Helping Military Family Caregivers, the author identifies similarities and differences among caregivers of service members and veterans and identifies challenges within their caregiving journey.

Part I: Recognizing their Similarities and Differences

While little research exists on military family caregivers, Part I, illustrates similarities and differences among caregivers of service members and veterans. For example, women most often serve as primary caregivers of service members/veterans. Of those caring for service members involved in Iraq or Afghanistan conflicts, 79 percent are women, and nearly all caregivers of veterans (96 percent) are women (Griffin, J.M., et al., 2012; NAC and AARP, 2009; NAC, 2010).  Among caregivers of service members who served in Iraq or Afghanistan, 62 percent are parents, and 84 percent are younger than 60. On the other hand, 70 percent of caregivers of veterans are spouses older than 50.

To continue to read about similarities and differences among caregivers of service members and veterans go to, Helping Military Family Caregivers, Part I: Recognizing Their Similarities and Differences.

Part II: Recognizing their Challenges

Many military families struggle to grasp their “new normal” as caregivers to their wounded, ill, or injured service members. Part II of the Helping Military Family Caregivers series identifies challenges caregivers commonly face, along with some important rewards they reap along the way. Challenges the article describes include:

  • A bumpy start to the caregiving journey
  • The potential length of the caregiving journey
  • Complex medical tasks
  • Feelings of exclusion from the care team
  • Stress and apathy
  • Mental and emotional distress
  • Secondary PTSD
  • Lack of support
  • Loss of income
  • Navigation through multiple bureaucracies
  • Military culture

The challenges that family caregivers experience as they care for their service members and veterans are significant. However, many feel that the role as caregiver has benefited them. To learn more about the challenges and rewards to giving care go to Helping Military Family Caregivers, Part II: Recognizing Their Challenges.

As a military professional, one of the most important things you can do is let family caregivers know that they’re not alone. Letting a caregiver know that he or she is not alone will help that individual realize that others are in similar situations and are coping with many of the same challenges.


References

Griffin, J. M.; Friedemann-Sanchez, G.; Jensen, A. C.; Taylor, B. C.; Gravely, A .; Clothier, B.; Simon, A. B.; Bangerter, A.; Pickett, T.; Thors, C.; Ceperich, S.; Poole, J.; & van Ryn, M. (2012). The Invisible Side of War: Families Caring for US Service Members with Traumatic Brain Injuries and Polytrauma. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation 27(1):3-13.

National Alliance for Caregiving (NAC) (2010). Caregivers of Veterans—Serving on the Homefront. Bethesda, MD: National Alliance for Caregiving. Retrieved January 1, 2011.

National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP (2009). Caregiving in the United States. Bethesda, MD: National Alliance for Caregiving. Retrieved January 10, 2010.  

Factual Friday: February 7, 2014

Friday, February 7th, 2014

4FF_Feb14

Source: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 2009

This post is part of a series of Factual Friday posts published on the Military Families Learning Network blog.

WEBINAR–Understanding the Outdoor Recreation & Restoration Program Leader as “Caregiver” in Returning Veterans

Tuesday, February 4th, 2014

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Join us at 11 a.m. ET on Thursday, February 13 for a 60-minute webinar on Understanding the Outdoor Recreation and Restoration Program Leader as “Caregiver” in the Returning Veteran Context: Identifying Training Needs and Gaps, presented by Keith Tidball, Ph.D. and Raymond Rainbolt.

Many returning veterans that engage in outdoor recreation and restoration activities report positive reintegration into civilian life. The importance of human-nature interactions in outdoor recreation activities among returning service members have shown to contribute to individual and community resilience among wounded warriors and their families.

This webinar will introduce the emerging role of outdoor recreation and restoration activities as therapeutic and resilience building for this generation’s returning warriors.  Special attention will be given to better identifying and understanding the role of “care-giver” in these emergent outdoor recreation and restoration programs for veterans, and then exploring what training needs might exist for these unique caregivers.

Presenters

Keith G. Tidball, Ph.D. is a veteran and social scientist in the Department of Natural Resources at Cornell University where he studies the human dimensions of natural resource management in disaster and war. To learn more about the benefits of nature-based programs for veterans go to Returning Warriors: Outdoor Recreation, Restoration & Resilience.

Raymond Rainbolt will serve as panel presenter for the webinar. Mr. Rainbolt is the fish and wildlife program manager for the U.S. Army at Fort Drum, located in northern New York.


No registration is required to join the web conference, go to Outdoor Recreation & Restoration Program Leader as “Caregiver” in Returning Veterans to find connection information and related resources. If you are not on an installation, you may need to install security certificates or use one of the other connection methods.

Factual Friday: January 31, 2014

Friday, January 31st, 2014

Factual Friday Jan 31

Source: Journal of Family Practice

This post is part of a series of Factual Friday posts published on the Military Families Learning Network blog.

Factual Friday: January 24, 2014

Friday, January 24th, 2014

Factual Friday

Source: United States Department of Labor, 2012

This post is part of a series of Factual Friday posts published on the Military Families Learning Network blog.

Factual Friday: January 17, 2014

Friday, January 17th, 2014

Factual Friday

Source: 2012 Point-in-Time Estimates of Homelessness Report

This post is part of a series of Factual Friday posts published on the Military Families Learning Network blog.