Tag Archives: financial literacy

Personal Finance Virtual Learning Event

The Personal Finance team will host our third Virtual Learning Event June 14-16. This year, we’ll focus on Financial Fitness. Join us as we engage with learners in this 3-day interactive series of events.

Join the Personal Finance Team June 14-16 for a unique online learning opportunity.
Join the Personal Finance Team June 14-16 for a unique online learning opportunity.

Schedule of Events

Tuesday, June 14, 11 a.m.- 12:30 p.m. ET: What is Financial Fitness & How is it Measured? Dr. J. Michael Collins of the University of Wisconsin, Madison will present this session, using the findings from the research he has gathered on this subject. Dr. Collins studies consumer decision-making in the financial marketplace, including the role of public policy in influencing credit, savings and investment choices. His work includes the study of financial capability with a focus on low-income families. He is involved in studies of household finance and well-being supported by leading foundations and federal agencies. In 2015, Palgrave Macmillan released a book Collins edited called A Fragile Balance: Emergency Savings and Liquid Resources for Low-Income Consumers. His 90-minute webinar on June 14 will focus on financial fitness as a goal for many people, but achieving fitness in terms of money management may require a combination of financial education, coaching, and financial access. After reviewing the components of financial fitness, this session will provide an overview of measures of financial capability and well-being, as well as practical applications of program measures in the field. The session will include discussion, interactive polling and Q&A.

Wednesday, June 15, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. ET: Positive Personality Traits of Financially Fit PeopleDr. Martie Gillen will deliver this 90-minute webinar using data and research from psychology that tells us what traits are most commonly found in individuals who make positive financial decisions. Dr. Gillen is the Project Investigator for the Military Families Learning Network Personal Finance team and an Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist for the Department of Family, Youth, and Community Sciences, in the Institute for Food and Agricultural at the University of Florida. Her research interests include personal and family finance, behavioral economics, older adults, Social Security retirement benefits, employment, retirement planning, financial social work, food security, and innovative post-secondary education models. The first section of the webinar  on June 15 will include an overview of personality traits as well as a discussion of the research related to personality traits and personal finance. The webinar will conclude will suggestions for working with individuals while taking into account their personality and impact on their personal finance decisions. Participants will have an opportunity to take a personality trait quiz.

Thursday, June 16, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. ET: Wealth Building with Saving, Investing & Windfalls. Dr. Barbara O’Neill will lead this session. Dr. O’Neill is a financial resource management specialist for Rutgers Cooperative Extension, has been a professor, financial educator, and author for 35 years. She has written over 1,500 consumer newspaper articles and over 125 articles for academic journals, conference proceedings, and other professional publications. She is a certified financial planner (CFP®), chartered retirement planning counselor (CRPC®), accredited financial counselor (AFC), certified housing counselor (CHC), and certified financial educator (CFEd). Dr. O’Neill served as president of the Association for Financial Counseling and Planning Education and is the author of two trade books, Saving on a Shoestring andInvesting on a Shoestring, and co-author of  Investing For Your Future,Money Talk: A Financial Guide for Women, and Small Steps to Health and Wealth.  She earned a Ph.D. in family financial management from Virginia Tech and received over three dozen awards for professional achievements and over $900,000 in funding for financial education programs and research. Her webinar on June 16 will focus on ways that ordinary people with average incomes can grow wealthy over time. The first section of the webinar will discuss time-tested investment and financial management strategies and the second section will describe dos and don’ts for handling a financial windfall. Resources for each topic will be shared including the Rutgers Cooperative Extension Financial Fitness Quiz: http://njaes.rutgers.edu/money/ffquiz/.

Thursday, June 16, 1-1:30 p.m. ET: 2016 MFLN PF VLE Wrap Up This half-hour event is designed to allow participants to share their own experiences from the 3 previous webinars, and to share findings from the assignments given during those sessions. Drs. Collins, Gillen and O’Neill be be on hand to guide this interactive discussion. If you are interested in sharing your experiences during this session, please email me at mollyh2@extension.org.

We hope you’ll join us for 3 days of interactive and engaged learning. For more information, click here.

Steps to Financial Freedom

Contribution by Molly Herndon and Carolyn Bird

Digging out of a mountain of debt can seem like an impossible task, and many resist asking for help. Service members may feel anxious about their options or be unaware of the wide range of services provided to them on base and, increasingly, online. As a PFM you may ask yourself– how do I help a service member find the motivation to stick with a financial management plan? Over the next few weeks, we will be going back to the basics by outlining steps and strategies you can use to help your clients who are looking for financial guidance to get on track.

Step 1: Assess the Situation
The first step is to assist the service member in getting the finances under control by assessing the current financial situation. The service member, and you, must know what you’re up against before you can create a plan to get out of the cycle of debt. Using a net worth calculator

Depending on the specific circumstance, you may recommend your client consider consumer credit counseling, debt consolidation, refinancing or transferring balances to get a handle on existing debt. Each of these strategies comes with advantages and disadvantages. It is important that the client be aware of and ask the lender for an explanation of any increase in the number of payments and interest rates or fees. A clear explanation of costs or extended periods of indebtedness will help the client to evaluate whether the plan is in their best financial interest. Credit repair agencies often promise to remove negative credit information for a fee. Be sure your clients know that the only legal method of improving a credit score is through a history of on-time payments or the removal of false negative information. Steering clients away from credit repair agencies is good practice, saving your clients valuable time and hard earned money.

These initial meetings may be a good time to suggest creating a monthly budget tracker. Tracking every penny that comes in and goes out is the only effective measure toward changing spending habits. Providing clients with an easy-to-use worksheet, like this one, may help clients get started with this new habit.

Step 2: Find the Motivation
What’s really important is what happens after the service member leaves your office. One way to motivate might be to show just how much the debt truly costs. Using the credit card calculator on myfico.com, I experimented with a balance of $3,000 at an interest rate of 18 percent and payments of $75 a month. Guess what? This debt costs $509 a year! Before you run the calculator, ask the service member about favorite hobbies or something he or she would like to buy. Run numbers on the calculator and show the service member just how much the debt at minimum payments is costing them each year. Ask if they wouldn’t rather use that $509 toward that hobby or purchase.

Step 3: Recruit Your Team!
While PFMs are part of the service member’s team for financial fitness, the most important team member is the service member’s spouse. Discuss with the service member how he will discuss this with his spouse to get her motivated too. Ask about the spouse’s favorite things and help the service member devise an approach that rewards both of them for working together toward a financial goal.

These are just the initial steps in working toward financial freedom. Later we will discuss saving, investing, and raising financially fit kids. There are many approaches to debt solution. What strategies have you found works well in helping service members turn their financial situations around?